Let’s Make Food Production Personal & Start a Home Growing Revolution

Let’s Make Food Production Personal & Start a Home Growing Revolution

Access to healthy, safe and sufficient food is critical to our global population as we continue to grow, urbanize and use more resources. Solutions that will successfully counter the negative effects of both poor nutrition and diet, and global food production (along with its multitude of knock-on effects including climate change, soil eutrophication, ecosystem collapse, etc.) are multi-faceted. This is not a simple challenge, and there is not a simple, one-size-fits-all solution. This post originally appeared as a guest post on Food Tech + Connect as part of their Internet of Food series.

Announcing the Grove Early Adopter Program!

Announcing the Grove Early Adopter Program!

Today, we announce the Grove Early Adopter Program!

100 Boston locals will be the first to purchase Grove Ecosystems and start growing food in their homes this winter.

In February, 2015 the first ~100 Groves will bring life into living rooms, kitchens, dining rooms, and dens within 30 miles of our Somerville Massachusetts office. The Grove Early Adopter program will be the first public trial of Grove Lab’s pioneer product — a living indoor ecosystem that grows sustainable and nutritional food right in your living space.

The Aquaponics Equations

The Aquaponics Equations

In aquaponics there are thousands of microorganisms and processes present that are interacting in ways we can’t even perceive. The game of aquaponics becomes more fascinatingly complicated the more you play, and the ecological cycles that support our growing should always be respected for what they are – ecological. But, like any game, the basics are easy to understand. So let’s talk about the bacteria of aquaponics. I’m going to share the two ‘aquaponic equations’ and discuss them so that you will be better able to understand and act when interacting with the bacterial colonies of you ecological system!

Urban Farming Around the World: Tiny Singapore Transforming the Game

We at Grove are always excited to explore world trends in urban agriculture. And when exploring what’s hot, it’s impossible to not look to Singapore. Once just a little kampong (the Malaysian word for farming village), Singapore has become an international marvel of planning. There are many ways in which they are changing the game, but what’s interesting to our context here at Grove is that this tiny little city-country has quickly become a leader when it comes to urban ag.

Why Some San Franciscans Don’t Want Urban Farms

Recently San Francisco broke another milestone. No, it wasn’t most number of individuals returning from Burning Man. The city became the first in the United States to offer financial incentives for urban farming. In exchange for allowing their empty lots to be used for agricultural purposes for five years, owners will save significant amounts on property taxes. While, on the surface, this seems like a positive law, some individuals take fault with the bill because of the extreme housing shortage in the city.

Farmers Market Fan? Here Are Our Weekly Recommendations & Tips

At Grove, we support any action that helps support local food producers, gets healthy food into the hands of consumers and improves how we access fresh food. So we make it a priority to visit the local farmers markets every week and pick up in-season produce. Given how much we love the market, I thought it would be interesting to highlight our purchases, give you a heads up for what you should be buying, and share an awesome recipe from a local Boston blogger Jen Che of Tiny Urban Kitchen.

New Growth Amidst Hurricane Katrina Destruction

For most people the first week in September is associated only with Labor Day, for those of us from New Orleans, this week brings back memories Hurricane Katrina. As I reflect on the destruction caused by the hurricane, I can’t help wonder how life post Katrina would have been different had I owned a Grove or if some of New Orleans’ newer agricultural companies and nonprofits had existed.